Crooked House Rugs – a passion for fibre and all the colours of the rainbow… and then some

Crooked House Rugs grew out of a lifetime of expressing myself in various fibres. I learned to knit and sew at an early age and the fascination for fibres and their tactile pleasures grew. Clothes for dolls, using cutouts and wrapping (which I later knew as draping) with minimal stitching began the joy of designing. Then crochet and quilting came along, with the attendant gathering of more yarns and fabrics. Cotton, linen, wool, mohair, silk… I was mostly drawn to natural fibres, but, for a short while, I dabbled in synthetics and blends. I taught myself pattern making from a Japanese fashion design magazine, picked up who knows where. I began to collect sewing machines as I got more and more enamoured with construction of clothes, home furnishings and accessories.

There was a Crooked House

One of my earliest designs

In the late 60s I attended Ryerson in Toronto, taking their 3 year Fashion Design, construction and merchandising course. We learned much about design, more exacting patternmaking, tailoring, millinery, illustration, colour, fabrics & fibres, business practices, merchandising and doubtless other courses lost to the mists of time. Years came and went, I married and produced children, now have three wonderful grandchildren; I worked at various times, sometimes in the world of fashion, either for a company or on my own, sometimes other occupations that presented themselves. During this time, I found rug hooking (traditional, not latch hooking) in 2004, or it could have been 2005. I wasn’t keeping a record; I was simply immersing myself in wool and design in another media. It resonates deeply with me and brought me through some dark times. Rughooking is a soothing, meditative activity and I knew it was for me after the first loop.

Wide cut and hand-torn wools make a strong statement

Wide cut and hand-torn wools make a strong statement

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